Open Source Release: js-hll

One of the first things that we wanted to do with HyperLogLog when we first started playing with it was to support and expose it natively in the browser. The thought of allowing users to directly interact with these structures — perform arbitrary unions and intersections on effectively unbounded sets all on the client — was exhilarating to us. We knew it could be done but we simply didn’t have the time.

Fast forward a few years to today. We had finally enough in the meager science/research budget to pick up an intern for a few months and as a side project I tasked him with turning our dream into a reality. Without further ado, we are pleased to announce the open-source release of AK’s HyperLogLog implementation for JavaScript, js-hll. We are releasing this code under the Apache License, Version 2.0 matching our other open source offerings.

We knew that we couldn’t just release a bunch of JavaScript code without allowing you to see it in action — that would be a crime. We passed a few ideas around and the one that kept bubbling to the top was a way to kill two birds with one stone. We wanted something that would showcase what you can do with HLL in the browser and give us a tool for explaining HLLs. It is typical for us to explain how HLL intersections work using a Venn diagram. You draw some overlapping circles with a broder that represents the error and you talk about how if that border is close to or larger than the intersection then you can’t say much about the size of that intersection. This works just ok on a whiteboard but what you really want is to just build a visualization that allows you to select from some sets and see the overlap. Maybe even play with the precision a little bit to see how that changes the result. Well, we did just that!

Click above to interact with the visualization

Click above to interact with the visualization

Note: There’s more interesting math in the error bounds that we haven’t explored. Presenting error bounds on a measurement that cannot mathematically be less than zero is problematic. For instance, if you have a ruler that can only measure to 1/2″ and you measure an object that truly is 1/8″ long you can say “all I know is this object measures under 0.25 inches”. Your object cannot measure less than 0 inches, so you would never say 0 minus some error bound. That is, you DO NOT say 0.0 ± 0.25 inches.  Similarly with set intersections there is no meaning to a negative intersection. We did some digging and just threw our hands up and tossed in what we feel are best practices. In the js-hll code we a) never show negative values and b) we call “spurious” any calculation that results in an answer within 20% of the error bound. If you have a better answer, we would love to hear it!

Comments

  1. great post

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